A work-in-progress. No publication date set.

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Origin of The Dragon Universe

I love science, science fiction, and fantasy. I always have. Nevertheless, it never occurred to me I could write it as a career. I had dabbled in writing stories for fun, but never considered it more than a hobby. Then along came the Internet and the methods it provided for sharing. I discovered people liked my fiction about Dragons, even as amateurish as it was. When career changes provided the opportunity to move into a new life, I had many options. I settled on pursuing a new career as a speculative fiction writer.

For years, I had successfully written technical documents and articles. What could be so hard about becoming serious about writing fiction? Everything. Fiction writing is not technical writing. Fiction requires a different skill set. I studied everything I could find to learn how to write quality fiction. I set a goal of 10 years, 10,000 hours, 1,000,000 words to hone my skills. I am not yet to the 10-year mark, but I have exceeded the 10,000 hours, and I have created nearly 1,000,000 words of trunk novel material. I am improving, but I still have more practice to do.

During those years of practice, experimentation, and development, I created the worlds, characters, and plots for The Dragon Universe. Initially, I imagined a single book, but I eventually realized the story was too large. Rather than lose the story's heart and soul by cutting it to an acceptable size, I split the five phases of the story into five books. When I finish with the current trunk novel version of the story, I will return to the beginning and apply everything I have learned to create a work of art.

I feel good about how well my writing skills have developed, I am pleased by how the story has evolved, and I am excited for what the future holds. While it is still a work-in-progress, The Dragon Universe is wonderful. Follow me on my journey by following me on my web pages, Facebook, and Twitter. When the final version of the books come to market, read them and let me know how I did.

Lester D. Crawford Blog


2017-04-30
Symptoms Instead of Causes

When I began this chapter, I was thinking the midpoint of act two was a big event in a chapter later in the outline. As I worked, I was also studying, again, character change arc concepts. An epiphany struck: the character change arc I had designed for this story focused on symptoms instead of causes.

While the protagonist’s three character dimensions defined in the story design are correct, a reevaluation of the character change arc revealed the correct Lie the protagonist believes and the Truth he needs to accept and pointed to this chapter as being the midpoint of act two.

Now, the 53,000 words that are the first half of this draft of book 5 need to be edited to apply this new understanding. This epiphany also affects the series change arc and the change arcs in each book of the series. Therefore, the 440,000 words in the drafts of the first four books need to also be reworked.

The net effect: better stories, after a lot of editing.

“You are not the boss of me.”

I stared at the Dragon, pondering his unexpected words, and feeling his aggravation through our bond.

“No, I’m not your boss. We’re partners.”

“You do not treat me as a partner. You treat me as if you own me.”

“You’re my Dragon.”

“You are not the boss of me.”

Draft Book 5 Chapter 15 Pages and Word Cloud

Draft Book 5 Chapter 15 Pages and Word Cloud


2017-03-31
Inspired by Uni the Unicorn

Somewhere, I don’t remember where, while wandering about in my writing community, someone recommended Uni the Unicorn by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Illustrated by Brigette Barrager. This is a children’s book for ages 3 – 7 years. My local library system has five copies all of which are currently checked out.

Following is the publisher’s description of the story.

“Uni the unicorn is told there’s no such thing as little girls! But no matter what the grown-up unicorns say, Uni believes that little girls are REAL. Somewhere there must be a smart, strong, wonderful, magical little girl waiting to be best friends. In fact, far away (but not too far away), a real little girl believes there is a unicorn waiting for her, too. This magical story of friendship reminds believers and nonbelievers alike that sometimes wishes really can come true.”

The story is lovely, but ends shockingly.

SPOILER ALERT! Uni and the little girl do not meet.

My reaction was, “What the heck!” The ending was not what I expected.

Scheduled for release on September 5, 2017, is Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Illustrated by Brigette Barrager. I hope Uni and the little girl meet this time.

I requested my local library system add the book to their collection. Recently, when I checked the status of my request, I found that, on by behest, they had ordered five copies.

Rosenthal inspired within me the desire to write my own children’s book influenced by the story-world in my current work-in-progress. My mind minions are already providing me ideas for the story and the lesson it will teach.

On March 13, 2017, Amy Krouse Rosenthal passed away. Rosenthal wrote more than 30 books. I, for one, had been touched by her writing. She will be missed.

Uni the Unicorn and Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True Book Covers

Uni the Unicorn and Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True Book Covers


2017-02-28
Planning and Plotting Better

As I near the midpoint of book five, I’m evaluating what I’ve learned about the craft of writing and about my story. I had written the majority of what is now book three before I decided the story had five phases that could each stand alone. Also, by splitting the story, I could keep the word count reasonable for each book instead of having a book the size only certain authors can get away with. One result of this decision was the need to rework each book to make their structures standalone.

Years of study and practice has increased my understanding and skill with story structure and character change arcs. Redesigning my story using that knowledge will improve the story, but the skill is not necessarily reflexive. To some extent, my innate story telling ability has served me, but to do better, I must think instead of relying on instincts.

I created a chart to help me visualize my goal of creating well structured standalone books yet have them progress in an overall series structure and to prompt me to envision how character change arcs apply to the books and the series. The chart isn’t spectacular, but I find it useful to stare at as my mind explores possibilities.

This is only a beginning, though. The next step is to document what my explorations reveal and plan how to pace the plot and change arcs across the terrain of each book and the series. How I handle the next step may become a blog post in the future.

Five Book Story Structure - Chart for visualizing story structure across a five book series.

Chart for visualizing story structure across a five book series.


2017-01-31
Enhancing my Skills by Reading the Best

C. J. Cherryh is a fascinating author. A while back, I read The Morgaine Stories (Gate of Ivrel, Well of Shiuan, Fires of Azeroth, and Exile’s Gate). Her use of tight third-person point-of-view impressed me. For me it was the tightest third-person I had ever read and felt as if it were first-person using third-person pronouns. Her skills at world building and creating characters also impressed me. Reading those stories, I learned techniques that helped me improve my writing.

Cherryh’s Cyteen also struck me as incredible in its world building and characters. The story left me thinking about nature versus nurture and what makes each of us what we are. I am still working on how to apply those insights to my own stories. I need to read Regenesis, the next book in the series.

Currently, I’m finishing up The Nighthorse Series a.k.a. The Finisterre Series, or The Rider Series (Rider at the Gate and Cloud’s Rider). Again I’m impressed, even awed. I see these stories as having a tight third-person voice, yet at moments, information is exposed in a tone that verges on omniscient. Those moments are so well integrated they flow flawlessly without knocking me out of the tight third-person perspective. Cherryh’s use of language and her sentence structures also impresses me.

While my voice is nothing like Cherryh’s, and I will never be able to write like her, or want to write like her since her style does not suit my voice, I am improving my craft skills by reading her work. More C. J. Cherryh books that will enhance my skills sit ready to read in my To Read pile.

C. J. Cherryh The Morgaine Stories, Cyteen, and The Nighthorse Series Covers


2016-12-17
Nose

Nose
by Lester D. Crawford

“We’ll never escape that hungry dragon. It’s my nose. Hide Hermey. Hide Yukon. I’ll lead it away.”

He dashed across the snowy meadow away from his friends who hid in a snow bank.

He was a reindeer. He could fly. He could and would out fly the dragon. He leaped into the sky, but a snap of the dragon’s jaws caught him.

The reindeer quickly slid down the dragon’s throat, a red glow in the dragon’s neck showing his progress until it became a wiggling glow shining through the dragon’s belly.

Hermey said, “Let’s hope for good weather this year.”

This story is for the Advent Ghosts 2016 Flash Fiction challenge organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

To see the stories others entered in the challenge, visit Advent Ghosts 2016: The Stories.


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