Space is vast. Earth bound humans have little perspective on just how big it is.

Within 50 light-years of Earth are around 64 stars like Earth's sun Sol. More than 500 reside out to 100 light-years. At 500 light-years the count becomes 64,000. For all types of stars, not just stars like Sol, the count at 500 light-years is at least a couple of million.

Planets reside around these stars. Some of those planets are inhabitable. Some are inhabited. Many species. Many societies. An old species of interstellar explorers is found on many of those worlds, a species that we would call dragons.

Milky Way Galaxy
Earth, Risiria, Hanalei, Dystopia, Utopia
(marked starting in upper right-hand corner)

A work-in-progress. No publication date set.

Read Flash Fiction by Lester D. Crawford.

Lester D. Crawford Blog


2020-09-30
Finished First Draft Now Time to Revise

I finished the first draft of my current project. Now it’s time to revise. Often, when I learn new things about my story, I go back to previous scenes to make changes, but sometimes the needed changes are too extensive. I make notes about those for use in my first revision pass.

Here are seven of the items I will review to see if I should work them into the story. Some of them probably aren’t needed and won’t be used.

1) The dragon economy uses delayed reciprocity and social ties as the means of exchange. Obligations to Kedekitley exceed Kedekitley’s obligations to others. Therefore, Kedekitley is affluent and prosperous.

2) Kedekitley is good at math and designing structures. Other dragons say he is a genius, although he disputes that. Early in his career, though, he made a math mistake that resulted in a structure collapse. Now everyone keeps reminding him of it, but in an admiring way because they say having only made one mistake is proof he is a genius.

3) Early in the story, Kedekitley mentions Xenkerdecley had spoken to him. Late in the story, he visits with him. In that scene, I realized Xenkerdecley is Kedekitley’s mentor and the dragon Kedekitley most admires. The magic and thrill I felt at that moment is what keeps me writing. I definitely want Xenkerdecley’s importance to Kedekitley to be shown in the story.

4) Kedekitley has no enemies except the Dragon Council (who prohibit interacting with humans), Cultists (humans who want to murder Naia because they claim she is a beast), Travis (who wants to restart the Dragon War), and Viren (who leads the kidnapping of Kedekitley’s human friend).

5) Dragons use aromatic (camphor-like) plants to keep insects out of their nests.

6) Kedekitley picks up Sten’s habit of saying “Oh, bother,” when things go wrong.

7) Dragons have more technology than I originally envisioned. After all, they are descended from spacefaring dragons who came to this world to have a more agrarian life, but they didn’t abandon everything technological.

So much work yet to do. So much fun yet to experience.


2020-08-31
Learning Character Details

When I envision and design a story, sometimes I already have a character in mind. Sometimes I create the character specifically for the story. In either case, I typically only have enough of the character designed for what the story needs to propel the plot. The character grows in depth as I discover the character’s details. This is one of the fun aspects of writing.

In my current story, the dragon Kedekitley is an example. At the story’s midpoint, Kedekitley points out to the human Sten that Sten has a mathematical calculation error in his bridge design. This is a turning point in the story as Sten learns the dragon is more than simply a beast of burden. The dragon is smart.

Later, in a scene with his life-mate Arizesyley, Kedekitley mentions finding the mathematical calculation error and blames it on Sten’s overconfidence. Arizesyley teases him saying Kedekitley knows about how being overconfident can cause one to make a mathematical calculation error. In his defense, Kedekitley says he only made a mathematical calculation error one time.

That exchange added facets to Kedekitley’s personality I had not known, and brought about scenes where other dragons mention he had once made a mathematical calculation error. Kedekitley is admired and considered a genius by the other dragons, but no one lets him forget he once made a mathematical calculation error.

I’m having so much fun.


2020-07-31
2020 Clarion West Write-a-thon Finished

At the end of the 2020 Clarion West Write-a-thon, I’m approaching the end of Fear Fallacy Friend‘s first draft and the beginning of the revision process. Also, details about a character for the next story have been collected because we briefly meet that character in this story. The future is looking bright for all involved.


2020-06-30
2020 Clarion West Write-a-thon

I’m participating in the Clarion West Write-a-thon again this year.

The Write-a-thon is a fundraiser for the Clarion West Writers Workshop. If you wish to donate to Clarion West, I invite you to go to my Clarion West Write-a-thon writer’s page and click on the Sponsor Lester D. Crawford button.

This year I’m working toward the completion of Fear Fallacy Friend, a story of a human and a dragon overcoming their differences to create a partnership that changes their world.

Clarion West Write-a-thon Badge
Clarion West Write-a-thon

2020-05-31
Continuing to Work on Overlapping Events

Moving through the overlapping portions of these two stories has been instructive. I experimented with different methods to keep the two stories in sync and found that simply opening the two documents side by side and stepping through paragraph by paragraph works best.

I’m also enjoying comparing overlaps between Tui T. Sutherland’s Dragonslayer and the two stories The Dragonet Prophecy (Wings of Fire, #1) and The Brightest Night (Wings of Fire, #5). One difference between Sutherland’s stories and mine is in her stories, the dragons and humans (called scavengers by the dragons) do not speak a common language. In my stories, the language in the two stories is the same. That means I must keep the dialogue matching exactly even if I change the action beats to accommodate the different point-of-view characters.

This is a good exercise, and the stories are excellent. I am continuing to learn as I work on the project.


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